Locked out. What is KVM?

When you lock yourself out of your car or house it is easy enough to call a locksmith;  locking yourself out of your dedicated server is a whole different level of frustration. It is easier than you think.  All it takes is one mistake when configuring a software-based firewall, and then you are no longer able to log into your server as root Administrator. The easiest way to address this is with KVM access to your server.  KVM is short for Keyboard Video Mouse, it gives you a separate IP to access your server and launches a Java-based screen that is like you are virtually standing in front of a video console plugged into your server.  KVM also gives you the ability to remotely power cycle your server at anytime, via the same separate IP address. Many of the dedicated server solutions available at PingPipe include KVM and remote reboot f0r free. On the internet, having redundancy  is very important. Let me repeat that: on the internet, having redundancy is very important. Suppport services are always available to physically reboot your dedicated server at the network level, the free KVM that is included on PingPipe dedicated server specials is a great value-added bonus of also always having an alternate way to reach the login prompt of your dedicated server. Visit pingpipe.com to check out all of the current dedicated server specials that include your own KVM with remote reboot and free setup !

Google tells Google Buzz to buzz off

On October 14 Google announced  that it would be shutting down Google Buzz, and the internet yawned. When Google Buzz  launched back in February 2010 many people thought that it was meant to be competition for social media giants Facebook, or Twitter, or something. It never really caught on with the general public, and had its share of problems during its short life. A big problem that Google Buzz had at the outset was with user privacy.  Instead of asking users about the specific details of their account that they wanted to disclose, Google Buzz would automatically list the names of each user's contacts that they chatted with or sent emails to. Another big problem was that the version of the service for mobiule phones automatically would publish the location from where posts were made. Fortunately this was addressed fairly quickly, but there was a lot of bad publicity generated over these privacy concerns. Many people wondered what Google was thinking by making a feature like publically disclosing a list of a user's contacts  opt-out. Any good marketer will tell you that you can gain favour by asking your subscribers if they want to opt-in to a feature, but rarely is there any advantage to demanding that they opt-out. This is especially true in matters of privacy. Google has launched many great products in the past. One that immediately comes to mind is Google Earth, which was developed from software that one of their aquisitions published. In that case they took a little known product called Keyhole and made it better.  With Google Buzz it seems that they were not so much trying to provide a service, rather they were trying to compete head-to-head with social media giants Facebook and Twitter.  Sadly,  they failed with Google Buzz. Only time will tell if Google Plus will follow in the footsteps of Google Buzz. Hopefully this won't be the case and people will start to embrace it the way that they have Google's other great products.
Posted in Internet Industry News, Search Engines at October 18th, 2011. No Comments.